Articles Posted in Alabama

Victims of sexual abuse or sexual assault in Alabama can file civil lawsuits against their abuser and other third parties, such as schools, churches, etc. Our sex abuse lawyers help victims get financial compensation by filing civil lawsuits against parties who negligently allowed the abuse to occur or failed to prevent it.

In this post, we will look at the process of filing a civil lawsuit for sexual abuse in Alabama. We will look at the relevant laws regarding sex abuse and the average settlement value of these cases.

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On this page, our personal injury lawyers will look at Alabama car accident lawsuits. We will review the key points of law relevant to auto accidents in Alabama and explain the average settlement value of these cases based on prior settlements and verdicts.


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Alabama Medical Malpractice Settlements

This page examines medical malpractice lawsuits in Alabama, focusing on the amount of money victims get from settlements or jury decisions.

The purpose is to give you an idea of what your medical negligence claim might be worth in a settlement or jury payout. Our lawyers also explain medical malpractice law to you, for you. not as if we were writing to an Alabama malpractice attorney.

If you’re an injury victim looking for compensation in Alabama, it’s essential to know how much money you might expect to get from your claim. After all, the primary goal of a personal injury or wrongful death claim is to get financial compensation.

Jury Verdict Research conducted a study of Alabama jury trials and found that the average personal injury verdict was $309,062.

As always, the high verdicts stretch the average, including a $12,000,000 verdict. The median compensatory award for personal injury trials in Alabama is $25,771. Plaintiff’s win – winning is defined as recovering some money damages – 47 percent of cases that go to trial in Alabama.

Putting those numbers in context, the national median is $40,000 and the nationwide plaintiff recovery probability is 48 percent.

Our national mass tort lawyers are pursuing cases in a number of class action lawsuits. Thousands of Alabama residents could potentially be eligible to become plaintiffs in many of these mass tort cases. In this post, we will summarize the most significant class action lawsuits that Alabama residents should be aware of. We will also explain who is eligible to become plaintiffs in the various class action lawsuits, what their potential chances of success are, and what their potential settlement value could be if successful.


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Alabama Medical Malpractice Settlements

If a child is seriously injured while under the supervision of a daycare or childcare facility, the parents can bring a personal injury lawsuit against the daycare. In this post, we will look at Alabama daycare injury lawsuits. Our daycare injury lawyers will explain when parents can sue for daycare injuries in Alabama and what the potential settlement value of these cases could be.


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Alabama Medical Malpractice Settlements

Absolute awful story here. A 300 to 400 pound arrival and departure sign fell on four members of a family, returning from a spring break vacation, while other family members looked on. The injuries sustained were just horrific, including the death of a ten year old boy.

Included in the wrongful-death lawsuit filed this week are nine contractors, designers, and construction companies. The suit states the defendants knew or should have known that airport visitors would be standing near the cabinet to read flight information. It further alleges that the defendants had numerous conversations regarding concerns over the instability of the cabinet and a foreseeable risk of fatal danger to the general public. There are three other cabinets, one of which was to be screwed into the concrete floor, and efforts were made to secure the second and third cabinets into the wall, ceiling, or floor. The fourth cabinet, the one that fell, was left freestanding without any anchors to the floor, wall or ceiling.

I’m sure that this case will involve a whole lot of finger pointing among the defendants, as well as a lot of he said, she said. However it wraps, this is just a horrific thing to happen.

electric shock lawsuitAn Alabama jury awarded $1.5 million to a man shocked by low-hanging power lines. The Plaintiff was paving a road in Alabama when his vehicle struck Black Warrior Electric power lines, sending 7,600 volts of electricity through his right arm.

Suffice to say, that is a lot of electricity, although voltage alone is cause for injury, it is the voltage multiplied by the current. Obviously, his insulation in the vehicle would be important. Still, it has to affect a jury to learn that the guy got shocked by an amount of voltage that is substantially less than the voltage given in the electric chair (about 2000 volts).

Plaintiff’s successfully argued at trial that this accident would not have happened if the power company had complied with national codes require that power lines that carry that amount of voltage be placed a certain height above the ground. The jury apparently agreed.

The Alabama Supreme Court has decided three medical malpractice cases in the last few months: Giles v. Brookwood Health Services, Weber v. Freeman, and Panayiotou v. Johnson. All three were decided in favor of the defendant doctor. All three decide as to who was at fault for the plaintiffs’ injuries/death out of the hands of the jury. I thought the Alabama medical malpractice lawyers in all three cases made quality arguments that the cases should go to a jury.

Giles was a complicated case involving three defendants. What I found frustrating about the opinion is that the court told the Plaintiff’s expert that “you really say what you think you said” about the standard of care. Why take this kind of medical malpractice case out of a jury’s hands?

Weber involved a nice Alabama rule to allow medical malpractice lawyers to name fictional defendants when the lawyer does not know who the real defendants are. Alabama Rule 9(h), Ala. R. Civ. P., provides:

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